“The Eternal Struggle Between Paralytics and Epileptics”

That’s Ortega y Gasset’s definition of history, according to Albert Camus’s 1951-1959 notebooks.

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3 thoughts on ““The Eternal Struggle Between Paralytics and Epileptics”

  1. Scott Lahti May 17, 2008 / 11:25 am

    Ortega ranked among the writers most often quoted

    http://www.manasjournal.org/biblio.html

    in my favorite periodical, the organic-humanist weekly MANAS (1948-1988), affording amplitude to its Thoreau/Tolstoy/Gandhi lineage, and if one were to expand Robert Crunden’s fine anthology The Superfluous Men, which centred round the New Humanists, the Southern Agrarians, and Nock, Mencken, Santayana and Lippmann, unto a global compass, Ortega, who was born in 1883, would be first among equals. I’ve only read The Revolt of the Masses and bits of The Dehumanization of Art. His “organic” take on the course of modern life has interesting phenomenological and existential strains, befitting a philosopher who studied under Germans in the earliest 20th century. He’s ripe for rediscovery, 75 years after his literary vogue in the early 1930s.

    Camus was also high among MANAS influences. Happily, the weekly’s entire 41-year archive is free for the browsing thanks to the good folks at the E.F. Schumacher Society of Great Barrington, Mass. Fans of Dwight Macdonald, Albert Jay Nock, and Wendell Berry, among many others – see my initial link above – will find much after their tastes therein.

    http://www.manasjournal.org

  2. Scott Lahti May 18, 2008 / 5:25 pm

    Three quarters a century after his literary vogue, Ortega y Gasset, is due for fruitful rediscovery. If you expand the late Robert Crunden’s fine anthology The Superfluous Men, which centres round the New Humanists, the Southern Agrarians, Nock, Mencken, Santayana and Lippmann, unto a global compass, Ortega, who was of their era (1883-1955), would be first among equals. The phenomenalist and existentialist strands in his thinking, natural enough in a philosopher who studied under Germans at the dawn of the C20, are quite interesting. I’ve only read The Revolt of the Masses and bits of The Dehumanisation of Art, but his body of work was vast, and exercised much influence on all manner of “organic” thinkers, from Richard Weaver to the editors of MANAS, who quoted him often.

  3. Daniel McCarthy May 18, 2008 / 9:54 pm

    (The somewhat duplicated comments above are thanks to my antispam software, which held up Scott’s first post — the software tends to get set off by links.)

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