The Right Choice for November?

Tying in somewhat with the discussion of Jim Webb below, here’s Andrew Bacevich’s conservative case for Barack Obama.

I’m not going to join the Obamacons — 2008 seems like a good year to vote third-party — but I’m rooting for Obama against Clinton and McCain.

Postscript: There’s one more round of Webb blogging here.

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12 thoughts on “The Right Choice for November?

  1. brooklyncopperhead March 20, 2008 / 2:53 am

    If only there were any decent third parties . . . .

  2. jefffrazee March 20, 2008 / 6:12 pm

    No Dan, all good libertarians should root for Hitlary. There is not an ounce of difference between her and Obama, except that she is downright evil and Obama is “hope”. I don’t want Americans to embrace socialism/fascism with the faith in hope. I want Americans to know that what they are receiving is as evil as the person that is giving it to them.

    When will we stop picking (or in your case preferring) the candidate that is perceived to be the lesser evil? No! When major policy positions are relatively the same, we want the most evil candidate to win.

  3. xenos March 20, 2008 / 8:51 pm

    It is ignorant to say there is not an ounce of difference between Obama and Hillary. There are plenty of differences, particularly when it comes to foreign policy.

  4. Daniel McCarthy March 20, 2008 / 11:49 pm

    I’m usually sympathetic to the worse-is-better argument at times like this. Frazee is almost certainly right that Obama will turn out to be no less interventionist than Hillary, and he’ll actually revive liberals’ enthusiasm in a was she can’t. But even if there’s only a slim chance that Obama will get us out of Iraq and stay out of Iran, that’s a reason to hope he’ll beat McClinton.

    We’ll all stop picking lesser evils when somebody good is actually running. That’s a goal to work toward. But right now it’s McCain, TweedleHill and TweedleO, and the third parties. Since I vote anyway — to cast my ballot against bond issues, constitutional amendements, tax-hikes, and other ballot initiatives — I might as well vote for a candidate. It’ll have to be a third-partier.

  5. Jesse Walker March 21, 2008 / 1:49 am

    even if there’s only a slim chance that Obama will get us out of Iraq and stay out of Iran, that’s a reason to hope he’ll beat McClinton.

    Or: Even if there’s only a slim chance that Obama will get us out of Iraq and stay out of Iran, it will be good to see the explicitly interventionist candidate rejected at the polls. Obama will campaign as the peace candidate; McCain will campaign as the war candidate; if war loses, that sends a signal to the political class.

  6. W. James Antle III March 21, 2008 / 4:44 am

    Yes, I remember the huge impact this fellow running on a humble foreign policy platform had. The political class doesn’t give a shit about what we think. I prefer Obama to Hillary, but am mostly indifferent to Obama versus McCain. Anyway you slice it, the next president will probably find a way to be even worse than Bush.

    I wouldn’t mind being wrong about this prediction, by the way.

  7. dylan waco March 21, 2008 / 5:05 am

    The gentleman that ran on a humble foreign policy did not do as well as some had hoped. The two Congressmen who ran as immigration restrictionist and trade hawks respectively did far worse.

    Interestingly the humble foreign policy fellow did very well with young voters..older GOP members and “conservatives” were more interested in electing Northeastern managerial liberals and career militarists, than anti-tax, pro-lifers or national identity, restrictionists.

    Let us hope the young don’t give up.

  8. jefffrazee March 21, 2008 / 7:53 am

    I think there was another candidate that ran on a “humble foreign policy” in 2000. The policy is the same. Intervention prevails. One terrorist attack and Obama will be in Pakistan. Regardless, I’m not willing to trade the gold mind that is Hitlary Clinton for a politician promising you hope in Iraq.

  9. W. James Antle III March 21, 2008 / 2:38 pm

    Bush was the humble foreign policy candidate to whom I was referring. I agree with Jeff Frazee.

  10. Robert Owens March 21, 2008 / 4:55 pm

    Have you folks looked at the advisors for Obama/Clinton/McCain? They all want a UN centered big government. There is NO difference except that McCain could probably do more damage because people do not seem to see through the sheep suit to revel the inner (big government) wolf. Everyone knows that Obama and Clinton are wolves.

    Focus on your congressional district – do some of the groundwork in your district that has already been completed in TX-14.

    As for President, consider the candidate from the Constitution Party. (knowing that your congressional choice is far more important)

  11. Scott Hughes March 21, 2008 / 8:15 pm

    For me, it’s hard not to like Obama. It’s hard not to get catch Obama fever. But I don’t vote. To get people to have hope in the hopeless is the trick of the bipartisan ruling class. I believe nobody will get elected who doesn’t serve the interests of those few who benefit from big government.

  12. Jesse Walker March 22, 2008 / 2:41 am

    Yes, I remember the huge impact this fellow running on a humble foreign policy platform had. The political class doesn’t give a shit about what we think.

    The election of 2000 did not turn on foreign policy. Whereas there is a good chance the election of 2008 will be seen as a referendum on the war. I’m sure the usual suspects will try to ignore it if it doesn’t go their way, but they aren’t the only members of the political class; a defeat for McCainism might help push some quaky pols toward taking more of a stand against the occupation.

    Or not! I don’t have much faith in presidential elections as a solution for anything. But to the extent that I care who wins, the Iraq issue pushes me to root for Obama.

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